Independent and Dependent Clause Quiz

Level: Intermediate / Upper-Intermediate 

In this independent and dependent clause quiz you have to identify whether the sentence in red is a dependent or independent clause. 

If you don't know the difference between these, then take a look at this types of clauses lesson before you start. 

Knowing the difference between independent and dependent clauses is critical if you want to avoid writing sentence fragments and write more complex types of sentence. 

Independent and Dependent Clause Quiz

Choose whether the highlighted part in red is an independent or dependent clause.

1. I will be so upset if she decides not to visit me.


'If' tells you that this is the dependent clause and also it would not make sense on its own. 'I will be so upset' makes sense on its own, so it's independent.

2.While I enjoy eating any type of food, my friend will only eat vegetarian.


The first clause does not make sense on its own, so its dependent.

3.Please let me know when you arrive.


The clause in red has 'when' at the start, so its dependent.

4.Although I know he's a famous actor, I can't remember his name.


This is an adverbial clause, and the part in red is the independent part of the clause.

5.My sister, who is in the police force, has always been very outgoing and confident.


The part in red is a relative clause and so is dependent. It would not make sense on its own but 'My sister has always been very outgoing and confident' could stand alone as a sentence.

6.I believe that he shouldn't have been elected Mayor.


The part with 'that' is a noun clause. 'I believe' is categorised as a complete thought so is the independent clause.

7.After you have finished your work, we can head out for dinner.


'After' should have made it clear that it's the dependent clause, and so the other part is independent.

8. Because they are accountable to the public, they must act appropriately.


This is an adverbial clause, with 'because' creating the dependent clause.

9. The car that has been stolen was parked in front of his house.


'That has been stolen' is the dependent part of this relative clause. The other part in red could stand alone as a complete thought if the dependent clause was removed i.e. 'The car was parked in front of the house'.

10.I'll be leaving my job soon as I'm close to retirement.


'As' should tell you that the second part of the sentence is a dependent clause.



 






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